Did anyone have the plague, also known as the "Black Death", on their 2024 Bingo Card? If so...BINGO! The bacterial infection that killed between 75 and 200 million people beginning in 1348 has been diagnosed in the United States.

Related: How Michigan Dies: The State's Top 50 Causes of Death

The bubonic plague is a rare but serious illness caused by a microscopic bacteria named Yersinia pestis. This tiny bacteria is usually carried by small mammals and their fleas, and are transferred to humans by these animals.

What Michigan Needs to Know: First Confirmed Bubonic Plague Case Since 2015

US Bubonic Plague Case Confirmed: What Michigan Needs to Know
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On February 7, health officials in Oregon say they confirmed a case of the bubonic plague. Dr. Richard Fawcett, Deschutes County Health Officer, assures that all close contacts of the resident AND their pet have been provided with medication to prevent illness.

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Oregon health officials believe the infection was passed along to the person by their cat's fleas. Both the cat and the individual are currently doing well because, fortunately, the case was caught early, posing little risk to the local community or the rest of the country.

Michigan Isn't a Stranger to Cases of the Bubonic Plague

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CDC / Canva
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The last confirmed case of the bubonic plague in Michigan was in Marquette County in 2015. Health officials in Marquette stated in an interview with the Detroit Free Press, officials stated the bacteria was transferred to the adult via a flea-borne illness they'd contracted while camping in Colorado.

Related: ALERT: Deadly Fungus Spreading Across U.S. Found in MI, IN, & OH

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) notes that diagnosing the plague early, as in the case of the Oregon resident, is the key to saving the life of the patient and keeping the disease from spreading rapidly.

Leading Causes of Death in Michigan

These are the leading causes of death in Michigan, according to the Centers for Disease Control via worldlifeexpectancy.com.

Gallery Credit: jrwitl

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Goosebumps and other bodily reactions, explained

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