Some of the most popular candies are part of a huge recall issued by Mars Wrigley. A voluntary recall has been issued for Skittles, Starbursts, and Life Saver Gummies according to a press release.

Why the Recall?

Mars Wrigley issued the recall for specific varieties of SKITTLES® Gummies, STARBURST® Gummies, and LIFE SAVERS® Gummies over concern that there was the potential presence of a very thin metal strand embedded in the gummies or loose in the bag. According to the press release, the products in question were manufactured by a third party and distributed in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

According to the TODAY Show, Mars Wrigley was made aware of the issue after there were consumer reports were made to the company. At this time there have been no known illnesses to date caused by the recalled gummies.

“We are voluntarily recalling specific varieties and limited production dates of various gummies as they may contain a small piece of a very thin metal strand,” a company spokesperson told TODAY via email. “We are working closely with our retail partners to remove any potentially impacted products from stores.”

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What Products Are Involved in the Recall?

To see if your candy is part of the recall, you will need to check the 10-digit manufacturing code on the back of the package. The first 3 digits will indicate if the package is part of the recalled list. There are a total of 13 affected items with various code numbers.

Photo: Mars Wrigley Press Release
Photo: Mars Wrigley Press Release
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Mars Wrigley Confectionery US, LLC is working with retailers to remove recalled products from all store shelves. You can view the entire list of recalled candy and the associated manufacturing codes here. If you have a listed item, immediately dispose of it, and if you have questions you can contact Mars Wrigley by calling 1-800-651-2564 or by visiting https://www.mars.com/contact-us.

 

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