Back in 2019, in the middle of summer, a Michigan man discovered a pile of snow in the Upper Peninsula. Yes, he found snow in July. No one wants to see snow at that time of year.

The temperature was nearly 90 degrees when Mark Mezydlo found a pile of snow on the Keweenaw Peninsula, about 25 miles south of Copper Harbor. It's common to find a ton of snow on the Keweenaw Peninsula during the winter months, but not in the dead of summer.

Mezyldo found the snow buried under roughly eight inches of sawdust at Sickler Industries, a sawmill that cuts panels and flooring.

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In the video that was posted to Facebook, you see Mezyldo covered in sweat and in shock over the discovery. I think anyone would be in shock if they found snow in late July. His reaction in the video is the best.

Mark Mezyldo:

I was looking for kindling and when I was standing on it, I bent down and thought 'why is this so solid? I brushed away like eight inches of shavings and there it was.

According to Fox 2 Detroit, an official from the National Weather Service in Marquette, Michigan said any snow sticking around this long into the year would have to be in a dark, moist area that isn't touched by the sun.

The discovery of snow in Michigan in late July must be some kind of a record.

I wonder if they'll find snow again this year.

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