What kind of low life company would charge over $9,000 to tow a semi-truck that was stranded in floodwaters? A tow truck company out of Detroit, that's the kind of company that would do that...and they did.

I won't name any names here but a tow company out of Detroit recently charged a semi-driver $9,100 to have his truck towed after he got stuck in the floodwaters on I-94 and Livernois Avenue.

The truck driver for GM Freight couldn't avoid the floodwaters as he got stuck in traffic, couldn't move, and then his cab started to fill up with water.

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According to WDIV Detroit, the driver was able to get out and the truck was towed off the freeway about 36 hours later. GM Freight said by then, floodwaters had started to recede. The cost for towing was $6,300, and the swimmer’s fee was $2,050.

If you're thinking that $9,100 is a fair number, it's not. Adam McCloe who drives for the trucking company says that he could tow a truck to Grand Rapids for $800. Even though this was in floodwaters, the truck was only towed seven lousy miles.

To me, this seems like nothing more than someone taking advantage of a situation and price gouging. That is something that Michigan Attorney General, Dana Nessel is concerned with.

AG Dana Nessel:

I am concerned that bad actors may use the weekend's flooding to overcharge or scam people who need assistance. Our Consumer Protection team is committed to investigating complaints.

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